#Conundrum, #earth, #love, #sierra-leone, #sierra-leone literature, #SierraLeone, #the human-condition, Blogger, Blogging, Nostalgia, Short Story, Uncategorized

The Disco Bash (Short Story)


It was the late 90’s to the early side of the 2000’s, the era of faded jeans, the Walkman paving way for the disc man and the trend of jazzy youth “luxing” in Freetown. One of the features in hailing from a family filled with older brothers and cousins is their knack of grilling, teasing and being initiated into a rite of never ending stories.

In the rare times I was granted permission to be in -“The Stronghold” as my brothers called their bedroom, I sat on the floor with folded feet and stared at them in awe and drank in every details as they conversed. I was a very curious kid, let me don’t euphemize, I was a very “congosa pikin”, and so when I was barred entry I found ways to eavesdrop.

Boy, the stories I heard! Let me tell you about the Disco Bash.

My brother, let’s call him Max had been in party prepping mode for a month. Trips to the barbershop with him returning doo rag donned to protect his waves, brand new Reebok Pump sneakers straight from the box and my dad’s Hugo Boss cologne suddenly going missing.

Dash card, cash box and neighborhood Sunday cleaning, Max left no stone unturned to raise funds.

Finally, the D-Day dawned, from what I could piece together from the narrative, the party kicked off with a bang. DJ Sonny was on location at Rumors Night Club swinging and the ladies came through in droves.

Then, the generator made a rumbling noise and went out. It was no trouble, a mechanic was handy, he sorted the electrical issue in no time to rousing cheers from the crowd and went home, assured his work was done.

Freetown had many rival social club sects back the who vied for premier relevance. Apparently, one of these groups had been plotting and planning to topple my brother’s sect.

The generator which had been marked as the weak link was first smoothly disconnected, then a big boom box tape recorder had recorded it’s sound and put on a repeat loop, whilst the generator was carted away. So when the lights went out again, all assumed it was just another electrical issue, it was sheer shock as my brother and his friends arrived at the backyard to see an old beaten down boom box at top volume bleating out generator noise.

Bad luck, they say come in series never single.

The ECOMOG located around the vicinity had been notified by a tip off (probably from the rival group) or rather just by the aggrieved crowd loudly venting at their party being cut short. It was after curfew hours after all, so when the ECOMOG breezed in with their vehicles, it was fleeing time as the palpable fear and possibility of the notorious soldier dubbed Evil Spirit amongst the Nigeria officers sent many flying as if their feet were those of Hermes.

My brother was never known for his athleticism; he was amongst the few caught.

His best friend -Sugarmouth Joe was selected to be the speaker when the soldiers enquired why they were out. Joe was a celebrated smooth talker and a lady’s man. By now, it was almost dawn and as Joe went ahead to make sign language and writing on the dusty earth, my brother and his cohorts knew they were royally in the deep end, because if Joe took the deaf and dumb route, it sure was trouble.

They took the belting that came in stride, and they were all dropped off at their various points later on in the day.

Max of course told a different story why he stayed away so long from home.

I later knew the real story because of my eavesdropping exploits.

Of course I could not just let this go, I noticed Max was very slow in sitting down, and a slight spasm of pain flickered on his face whenever his bum touched a chair.

I chose those specific moments to go “Vroom, Vroom, Ecomog day kam, I am a Disco dancer” and he would chase me across the room, but I always fled from his grasp.

Max was never a good sprinter.

THE END

NB

* Luxing was a slang in Krio in the 90’s that translates to define a well dressed individual.

*Congosa Pikin is a phrase in Krio that translates to an extremely inquisitive and stubborn kids.

#Conundrum

Freetown Night Life by Dominique Fofanah
Freetown Night Life by Dominique Fofanah
#AfricellSL, #Conundrum, #KamandaKoroma, #love, #poem, #poetry, #sierra-leone, #sierra-leone literature, #SierraLeone, #the human-condition, #tourism, Blogging, Commercial Transportation in Africa

Commercial Transportation Industry in SL: The Keke Takeover.


The Culture

If you are looking for an Uber in Sierra Leone, you won’t find any.

What you will find however, is a colourful history of a commercial vehicle industry that is prone to twists, turns and countless anecdotes.

Buses and Taxis share dominion in most countries around the world in the commercial transportation industry. In Sierra Leone the ‘Poda Poda’ challenged that hegemony. The motorbikes dubbed ‘Okada’ came next which was then followed by the quaint motor tricycle called the ‘Keke’.

Poda Poda’s generally come in the form of mini buses or vans with certain level of local customization work done on them to increase space for passengers inside. The vehicle’s seats are removed to be replaced by metal frames fitted with a thin layered cushioned seat. The driver is usually assisted by a conductor referred to as an apprentice. The experience of riding a poda poda is nothing short of priceless.

I was around 6 when I had my first Poda Poda experience. A family friend, one of the type that had become so close that you gave them the ‘Uncle’ title was tasked with ensuring me and my cousins board a taxi safely to visit our grandpa who lived in the East End of Freetown.

Uncle (let’s call him, Victor) had other plans. Poda Poda fare is relatively cheaper than taxi and uncle Victor had to foot the bills of a date he had planned with a dame the next day. Yes, yes of course don’t ask, we took the Poda Poda and boy was it an exhilarating experience. I was quite confused on what to make of the conductor known as the ‘Apprentice’, who was a pimpled face teen who switched emotions like the colours of a kaleidoscope.

One minute he would be smiling and regaling passengers with funny jokes and the next he would go livid with rage at someone who failed to pay and wanted to sneak out. He was quite skilled in creating very descriptive curse words, I was young then but reminiscing on that moment, I now saw in him one who with the right coaching would have made a great poet. I soon learned that an apprentice had to be vigilant as the driver would deduct the unpaid fares from their wages at the end of the day.

Poda Poda is the premier means for commuters in Freetown and those who live in the outskirts of the city. You’re bound to hear the latest gossip, stories and political bickering whilst in a poda poda as its passengers reflect the vast majority of ordinary Freetonians. The loud booming speakers with the latest hit songs has made poda podas quite popular with secondary school going children who carefully select which poda poda to board based on its stereo quality. In fact, in my secondary school years I looked on in envy as my colleagues arrived and left school with poda poda, the close proximity of my home to the Sierra Leone Grammar School meant I arrived to school by private vehicle, then boarded a taxi or sometimes walked back home.

I naturally had to find a way to break this deadlock, and as things tend to fall into place when we least expected it, some teachers started organizing after school lessons in the far end of town, I was amongst the first to sign up. Poda Poda took us to and fro, and of course my friends and I chose the one with the groovy bass and funky tunes.

The signature yellow of taxis in Sierra Leone feel almost as if they sprung up along with the iconic Cotton Tree at the center of Freetown. Taxi drivers are by far the most garrulous characters and they all share an unspoken code that makes it seem like they all belong to the same family. I used to think that all taxi drivers were related, until I witnessed a falling out over brought about by traffic jam and dangerous driving.

Growing up in the city of Freetown, reading the graffiti-like inscriptions on these vehicles was one of the high points of my day. Ranging from religious quotes, music lyrics and everyday proverbs on life, they had an allure of their own and sometimes, with it a penchant for throwing away the rules of spellings out of the window. As a staple of the city, they form an integral part of Freetown’s identity.

Taxis tend to be free roaming and sometimes territorial, in certain points around the city only taxis registered under a union are allowed to ply their trade along such routes.
The taxis of Wilberforce and Murraytown used to always be subject of jokes due to the derelict conditions they tend to be in, mostly the drivers had no keys to start the engines with and passengers stared on as the car is hot-wired manually with two cables. This experience is particularly unnerving for first timers as this process comes well under way after the vehicle had started moving. Thankfully, the conditions of taxis in those areas are far better than what they used to be.
Taxis are very popular with primary school children. The go to method for most kids to bypass paying the transport fare of two was termed “tote”. Basically what we did as kids that children still do was to have an older kid seated whilst another sat on their lap. Interestingly, this pyramid method can go up to a third kid at the apex just brushing the headliner upholstery of the taxi. Of course drivers had to put their foot down from time to time. Taxis enjoyed a long run on this demographic of clientele until the….wait I’ll touch on this later.

The Okada’s advent in Sierra Leone was not met with fanfare , it suffered from extremely negative P.R which in some cases wasn’t unfounded. Privately owned motorbikes had always existed but the idea of it being used as a method of commercial transportation was very alien to many Sierra Leoneans.

The city of Bo was the first to accept it, it wasn’t long before Okadas roamed the streets of Freetown.

Fast, efficient and able to weave between the spaces during extremely tight traffic jam, available late nights and able to meander through roads that taxis and poda podas couldn’t, okadas won the hearts of many people in quick succession.

It’s not a strange sight these days to see individuals park their private vehicles, disembark and wave down an okada bike to transport them to wherever they are going.

Zooming and zig zagging along the highways of the city has not made them pals with the traffic police who periodically declare okada no go areas. These rules are mostly flaunted and sometimes lead to Hollywood movie type chases and encounters between the cops and okada riders. Cops resort to methods like whips in hand which they lash riders with, barricades are sometimes used, or plain clothes tax force units who remove the keys from unsuspecting bike riders waiting to pick up passengers at stop points.

Okada riders are distinct in their appearance. Garbed in large top coats with several layers of clothes under and a distinct aura of menthol to safeguard against the breezey and cold winds when at top speed. The helmets or ‘He-lements’ as most call it comes in varying degrees of types, shapes and form that meet or do not meet the Sierra Leone Road Transport Corporation (SLRTC) standards.

Skateboarding, Construction worker, Formula One, Pilot, Skii, Firefighter and Cricket helmets can be seen on the heads of passengers who take okadas.

There was one time I was so fascinated with a NFL helmet I encountered that came with the logo of the Vikings and had the autograph of Brett Favre. How the rider came to have it is still a mystery, I offered to buy it but the rider refused, he needed the helmet for safety from the popos, and so a possible collectors item slipped by me.

Kekes came with a bang to Sierra Leone, with the novelty and allure from seeing it in the maiden movie, “Ong Bak’’ of now popular Thai actor Tony Jarr, the dainty and cuteness of the tricycle looking vehicle stole the hearts of most Sierra Leoneans.

They arrived in many colours with slight variations but all airy with window blinds and a touristic feel. My first Keke ride was fun, and a friend who saw me remarked to me later in Krio, ‘You bin sidom and relax some kind way insai the keke lek na you private jet’ – (You sat relaxed in the Keke as if you were in a private jet you owned’). A Keke ride for many first timers is documented by selfies, it is undoubtedly a transportationsystem that doubles as a euphoric experience.

The Industry

The commercial transportation industry is a sector that has always flowed with the tides of inflation in our nation’s economy and global fluctuation of crude oil which influences the price of fuel that has a direct ripple effect on fare costs.
Most commercial vehicles are not owned by their drivers, the arrangement is a fixed amount that the driver must return to the vehicle owner at the end of the day known as the “Head Money”.

The amount is subject to the cost of fare and the type of commercial vehicle.

  • Poda Poda is based on the seat capacity; Four Row Seaters Le 200,000, Five Row Seaters Le 250,000 and Six Row Seaters Le 300,000 and the Coaster Le 400,000
  • Taxi- Le 70,000
  • Okada-Le 90,000 or Le 100,000
  • Keke-Le 100,000 and the larger 3 row seater Le 150,000

Presently, the standard fare rate for a fixed point to the next stands at;

• Poda Poda -Le 1500
• Taxi- Le 1500
• Keke-Le 2000

• Okada- Le 2000

*Note: 1USD is Le 9000

A commercial driver is responsible for minor vehicular maintenances and care, an owner may only step in for serious issues. A major drawback for many drivers is the corrupt portion of the police force who harass them for money. During conversations with drivers they will bemoan on their run ins with cops, passengers who refuse to pay and owners who are never understanding of their plight on the streets.

Owners also tend to narrate their own negative experiences with drivers who treat the vehicles with abject disregard of its value because it was not purchased by their own money.
Depending to whom you want to believe, it is safe to say the dynamics of any business has its positive and shortcomings.

Rivalry

There is an intense rivalry amongst these commercial vehicles to win over passengers and popular opinion.

A friend’s sister once related to me a story on how one time she was hailed by a Keke driver but when she responded that she was heading to Dovecot market and thus her cheaper option was a poda poda.

The Keke rider hit her with a classic line, “Well you go dance reggae tay you reach’’ (You will dance the reggae moves until you arrive at your destination) indicating the swaying motion she would encounter on her trip due to potholes and the rickety poda poda she boarded.

Taxi drivers have no love lost for Keke and Okada rider who they perceive as usurpers and uncouth thugs with no respect for traffic rules. The importation of the three seater Keke has made many a taxi driver to curse and swear loudly of the of unsafety conditions of these keke hybrids.

The Keke and Okada riders on the other hand will tell you that the taxi riders are just bitter since keke/okada riders make double their wages.

Many companies in the nation have lately been making bonanzas and promotions which feature the Keke as a top prize.

Africell Sierra Leone( https://www.africell.sl/ https://www.facebook.com/AfricellSierraLeone/ ) , the premier telecoms network in Sierra Leone gave up to 30 Kekes in their Christmas promotion. The Keke has featured heavily in music videos and has even been used as motorcade entourage for weddings.

Sierra Leoneans in the diaspora who came last December for the holidays were big patrons of the Keke. The Keke it seems is here to stay, but in an ever evolving world of ideas, innovations and new trends it will not be a surprise to see a new commercial class type vehicle dock on the quays of Freetown that will once more overhaul the status quo.

As was inscribed on my favourite taxi, “Only Time Will Tell’’.

#Conundrum

Keke
Taxi.
https://www.facebook.com/AfricellSierraLeone/
AfricellSL Keke Promotion https://www.africell.sl/ https://www.facebook.com/AfricellSierraLeone/
Biker Riders with their Okadas.
Poda Poda

#Conundrum, #love, #poem, #poetry, #sierra-leone, #sierra-leone literature, #the human-condition, Blogging

WordSmiths


York, Sierra Leone. Photography by Nadia Assad

I’m a thief just a peg lower than Robin,
donning a hood Issa Kabbah never unveiled.

Poaching feelings across minds and giving them wings.

Letting them fly to the welcoming hands of estranged lovers
to use as weapons,
in status’ shade wars.

Subliminal yet direct.

Quotes coated in Quixote bravery

Memes Galore.

But then what are we if not mercenaries?

A La God, Allah Messengers to the masses.

What of those in homes whose only solace reside in our words,
and in these moments feel connected to a larger hive that understands the deep pits of depression that internet clout chasers skim over.

We give you passion.

We dish you joy.

And mash your wins to look back on the L’s you took that left you shook.

Of beautiful sunsets and wild romance.

Discreet flings and getting turned down in love at your first advance

In denial of the face of pain and shedding Nile long tears,
and losing loved ones in this mortal world.
We stand by you with all the memories.

For we are dealers.

We peddle and walk the corners of your lives.

We deal in feelings.

The real trap lords, WordBangers.

So when next you see me and remark.

‘You don’t look like a poet’

I’ll smile and reply,

‘What do human feelings look like’?

#Conundrum

#Conundrum, #KamandaKoroma, #landmark, #love, #poem, #poetry, #sierra-leone, #sierra-leone literature, #SierraLeone, #the human-condition, #thoughts, Blogger, Blogging

Blogging from Sierra Leone: The ‘Why’.


There are millions of narratives online about people and their stories, mostly as strangers without meeting each other we connect with these experiences as we find ourselves relating to them. The intricate nature of human existence is the simple truth that in our differences we notice familiar things that brings us to the earthy truth that we are but just a singular race.

Every human has a story to tell and it’s no wonder in this day and age why blogging holds such a strong allure. Strangely the idea to create a blog to post my poems, articles and ramblings came not from me , but from my cousin, Ibrahim Jalloh (R I P).I had shared a piece via WhatsApp to him and after reading, he remarked that it would be a great idea to have a platform to air out my writings.

In his words he said, ”Kamanda, you have to save your writings and keep them so that they can be a moment in time when you had these thoughts. After all, even if no one reads them, they will always live”. These words rang true, Ibrahim always did have a penchant to say the rights things in a modest way.

Naturally I had some misgivings about the whole idea out of fear of internet trolls and another from the insecure idea that I thought my writings weren’t good enough. I slept on his advice. Several days later I set up a WordPress account and the rest as they say is history.

Blogging from Sierra Leone is not an easy feat. For starters, the internet penetration in the country is relatively low, and the data charges are somehow steep. Less than 10% of Sierra Leone’s approximately 7 million citizens utilize any social media tool and of that number the vast majority use Facebook and the cross platform app WhatsApp the most.

The reality is if you intend to tell the Sierra Leonean story via blogging, you come to terms with the stark truth that your countrymen will most likely not be a huge chunk of your audience. This realization alone is enough to deter many, I have known many fellow writers who started off writing on WordPress or Blogspot only to abandon it due to lack of instantaneous followers. Some chose to stick to Facebook blogging with the same recycled audience and recycled feedback.

I was tempted to take the easy route, but I did not. It dawned on me slowly that it would be better to grow an organic following from complete strangers and also from people I knew who would click my WordPress blog link to let my writing speak for itself. I held the firm belief that if I had to evolve from the cocoon of familiarity of the usual audience feedback that my Facebook posts garnered, I would be stuck in an endless loop, and what I craved was growth along with a bigger platform to tell my stories.

It has been almost two years now and I am approaching 500 followers. Through it all I have learnt some vital lessons. Blogging like any art form requires dedication. You have to put in the work to connect with your audience. The sooner you realise that the quality of your content will boost or reduce the feedback you get, the wiser you will become.

There is nothing I appreciate more than the feedback from readers and fellow bloggers, every comment or a like indicates that someone, somewhere took their time to read what I had to offer and leave a response. On some days as a dabbling writer that is the only thing we require, it’s less about a thirst for the spotlight and more about appreciation that comes with understanding. Blogging brings you closer with the art of others that gives you the necessary push that also stimulates the growth of your own art.

I can say without an iota of doubt that my writing has improved because I have encountered sound writers on this WordPress platform who have directly or indirectly influenced me with their brilliance and simplicity in tackling complex issues.

Blogging instills in you the confidence to air out what you have been stifling. The relief that such an outlet offers is priceless. To tackle the social ills of a nation on a broad expanse of issues and proffer solutions. Every complimentary feedback I receive motivates me to do more and tell our stories.

To every other Sierra Leonean blogger out there, keep doing you. Tell your story.

I will keep on blogging and sharing my experiences, as a voice from the western side of my continent, and let our stories be part of the album of the playlist of the myriad online stories written by people from around the globe.

In the words of Marco Koroma,

“Impact is greater than clout”.

#Conundrum

#Conundrum, #KamandaKoroma, #love, #poem, #poetry, #sierra-leone, #sierra-leone literature, #thoughts, Depression

Mind Trip.


A paper plane for your crashed thoughts?

Pennies are too heavy

Would your heart lift and take wings if I put a price on it.

Unload this burden on me, like a feathered quill in the hands of a composer crafting his last symphony.

Lonely balconies hold secrets of days when the mind leaped over the rails a thousand times.

Mournful gaze sailing to the moody sunset.

The chaos of peace
And calm in turmoil.

I’ll extend a hand to you

as a testament to show I’m always here for you.

I promise not to say the right things,

I’ll just hug you tightly with the embrace of my beating heart

and these words from my pen and let you know that you’re not alone.

#Conundrum

#KamandaKoroma, #love, #lust, #nature, #poem, #poetry, #sierra-leone, #sierra-leone literature, #the human-condition

Shades of Love


Photography by Kamanda Koroma, “Leicester Peak“.

Listen; even if rainbows were to forget to postlude storms; or sunsets the profane cains

of days; or dew to wash away

the sins of flowers when dawn

breathes upon us; or the dead

to ascend into the promised Heavens

I will never forget to bathe you

With these three words; banal they may seem, but they are yours from the deepest parts of me; the shadowed, the unseen, the scared, the fragile, the flawed;

I love you…

The type of love that’s reclusive
but appreciates the outdoor freedom of open affections

Chit chat and toothy smiles, small talk and long walks in shady alleys and bright lanes

Why tilt the scale when it balances the unresolved emotions and unspoken words like afro combo at mardi gras?

Take my hand and let’s fly across the memoirs of lovebirds in bourbon street;

sip on the intoxication of these three words..

“I love you”

…and I’ll tell you I love you till the words die on my lips

Till they cave inside of my chest and crumble like sandcastles inside of my belly

Till they fade from my breath, and my throat is hoarse from their use

Till my voice breaks at the thought and my tongue can no longer form the words.

Till they wane from memory and dissolve into stardust.

But until then. Until then;

I love you.

#VF

#Conundrum

#TMA

#KamandaKoroma, #sierra-leone, #sierra-leone literature, Uncategorized

Kossoh Town Boy: A Time Capsule of Pre Independence Sierra Leone


Reading has always been a passion of mine ,since my early years when I discovered this wonderful world of words, sometimes fiction or real in the pages of books wrapped in letters.
I fell in love. 

This is not to say I divorced my toys, but its safe to say they took a somehow distant second fiddle in my mind.
As time passed, my relationship with reading grew. During my countless journeys into the land of reading, it wasn’t long before the noticeable absence of encountering authors or poets from my country Sierra Leone started weighing on my mind. Naturally my curiousity kicked in which eventually led me to discover(re-discover) them for myself .What was more shocking was how talented these writers were, yet they had received or were receiving little recognition in my country, and  their works remained largely forgotten or ignored. Their names were familiar to only the avid readers in Sierra Leone who like myself had searched for them or had prior knowledge from another source.
Sierra Leone was in the midst of its own Dark Ages regarding the arts at the time, hopefully springs of hope are currently bubbling.
But I digress from the purpose of this article.
It was in my fourth year at the Sierra Leone Grammar School at the annual prizegiving ceremony that amongst the prizes I received, the one merited for first in English Language was a novel. 

At first glance, it seemed like a plain, non assuming book , on its cover was the title ‘Kossoh Town Boy’ with its author’s name below in block letters, ROBERT WELLESLEY COLE.

I turned a few pages, speed read through the first paragraph but eventually tossed it aside for later reading after I was done with the just released Harry Potter novel my friend Siati Charles Kormoh had grudgingly lent to me the previous day.
Kossoh Town Boy had to wait for 2yrs before I would touch it again .

Awaiting the WASSCE result during the school break is mostly a bore, compounded with the fact that my laptop had just crashed. I had to scavenge for old books to wile away the time when I stumbled upon my Kossoh Town Boy novel again.

I mixed my usual cup of tea which is my ritual before reading a novel and the rest is history.

Kossoh Town Boy left an impact that imprinted on my mind.
Robert Wellesley Cole an accomplised surgeon in the early 20th century with a great track record in the medical service had penned his childhood memoirs with a brilliance reminiscent of the murals/frescoes of Rennaisance maestros.

Kossoh Town Boy is a time travelling work of art into the geographic, ethno lingual, evolving political and multi cultural landscape of Freetown in the pre independence years, specifically between 1907 – 1930, with brief forays in years earlier than 1907.
The deft way he described the geneological makeup of his Krio lineage , the Kossoh tribe assimilation, the connection stretching back to the Igbos and Yoruba from Nigeria and the West Indian connections that amalgamated into his immediate family is masterful. 

Freetown from the eyes of a young Robert called Ageh in the novel is one of vast potentials and promise.

Religious tolerance that has survived on to this day is a hallmark that runs throughout the book.

 A city where educated Krio christians lived happily alongside native pagan tribes that back then still held on to polytheist beliefs whilst also getting along well with muslim Temnes, Madingos or Fullahs speaks volumes of the origins of stability and cohesion that has existed in Freetown effortlessly through the ages.
The British Crown Colony’s occupation of the West African colonies of Ghana(Gold Coast), Gambia , Nigeria and Sierra Leone is also spelt out with the interconnection between the denizens of these separate countries. 

This was a time when a West African could claim to belong to all colonies. 

An individual might be born in Gambia, attend school in Sierra Leone , work in Ghana then settle down with making a family in Nigeria.

The tincture of subserviency to the British colonialist is also crystal clear but the blooming seeds of Sierra Leone nationalism had been sown, sprouting flowers in the hearts and minds of young Sierra Leoneans aiming for excellence.

The entrepreneurship of merchant Syrians as the indigenous population also ventured into trading is worth noting when drawing comparison with the replacement of Syrians to present day Lebanese foreign nationals who in some ways have become nationals in their own right.
In narrating his early years, one can not help but feel a sense of nostalgia of a time gone by when family ties were stronger as a tight knit group of loved ones, and just not a societal construct.

From the strict father, to the loving but stern mother , the doting grandmother with the matriachal wisdom and the neighbours who also in many ways eschewed the latin phrase of ‘in loco parentis’.

Communities were as families.

All kids were ingrained with high sense of values, discipline and respect between/ amongst their peers and also for elders.
The filial in-house mechanics of Ageh’s family was one were his father imparted wisdom to his two sons with the need to evaluate thought before actions and sometimes enforced his authority via corporal discipline when they misbehaved, this was an era where the Biblical rod still ruled. 

Its hard not to admire the innovation and resourcefulness of the people at a time when technology was at a creeping stage.

The warm bath used to combat fever and the enema treatment to ease constipation are but vestiges of the past when compared to current improvement in medicine.

Hammocks were used before the advent of cars which had not yet plied the streets of Freetown, they however had the added advantage of enjoying picturesque virgin forests laden with fruits , breathtaking views of the ocean and encountering animal wildlife along the way on such journey trails.

His descriptions of the vegetations at mount aureol, the winding paths to the newly constructed family house and the sense of pioneer living is one he paints with vivid imagery.
Inducing a sense of forgotten memories in the heart of every male when he mentions the games that he played which up to present day boys still engage in but in lesser numbers is timeless;from hand stoning mangos to riding ‘gigs’, taunting fellow classmates into starting fights, the wrath of the class bully and dusty winding home treks that were filled with adventure . The feeling of childhood is imbibed in his narrations.
In conveying the theme of the overreaching African patriach who controlled the decision of his children, prevalent as it is throughout the novel, he shapes it with the hindsight that his father did all in the wisdom of his(Ageh’s) interest and such some decisions were made before asking him which the ever docile mother supported her husband.

When his dream of attending the CMS Grammar School( now Sierra Leone Grammar School) after completing his primary school was postponed, he utilised such an instance to make the point that it inadvertently led to him becoming the student listed as number 1 on the first government established secondary(now Prince of Wales) in Freetown. Partriachy was quite common during that era and exists on to this day.

The subsequent success he achieved in his exams were marks of his astute devotion and quality education offered at the time, an education standard which has over the years dwindled and plummeted in quality in Sierra Leone.

 Ageh’s elation when he switced school is well narrated.

The Sierra Leone Grammar School may have moved location and dropped the CMS when it adopted ‘Sierra Leone’ since the days of Ageh, but it has not lost the camaraderie feeling which he described amonsgt the students or the richness of history of tradition and academic excellence. As I also went through the halls of that school I couldn’t help but smile or laugh heartily at the experiences he shared , the similarities between his and every Regentonian is timeless and striking.

The espirit de corp still lives but the rivalry with Methodist Boys High School has waned through the years, but the academic excellence hasn’t. Likewise the relationship it shares with its female counterpart Annie Walsh Memorial school has thrived on. The musing as he grows into a young man and starts noticing the blossoming growth of the opposite gender which he had overlooked in his pre pubescent years makes way for a young man naive yet confident to employ the chivalry route but who has in him instilled the virtuous chaste ideas of a Christian boy.
As times have changed and the city has transformed in many ways, I sometimes try to imagine through the eyes of Ageh how the landmarks locations , and streets mentioned in the book had looked like in the time of Ageh. Sometimes, my thoughts trail to the processions he witnessed and described during the holiday seasons. 

From the Christmas morning bells to its service, to the ‘Mamipara’ men on stilts , to the oiled dancing ceremonial Bundu girls, the Egugu devils and the various spectacles that came with those bygone days.

The sad realisation dawns that along the way we have allowed the erosion of our culture , and with it a sense of loss as you peruse through the pages of Kossoh Town Boy and juxtapose the industriousness, promises and ambitions of the people back then to our current generation.

We may have all the technological advancement but there is a lot to learn from the memoirs of a young Robert Wellesley Cole.
Its worth a read by every Sierra Leonean, not just as a novel but as a historical source.
I end with a quote from Kossoh Town Boy 
“I realise that I am talking like an adult now.

That is inevitable

we feel best as youngsters.

but, alas we need the intellect of maturity to analyse what we felt.

We depend on memory.”
RIP Robert Wellesley Cole 

1907 -1995

#sierra-leone

#Conundrum (Kamanda Koroma)

Front Book Cover of KOSSOH TOWN BOY

The prize stamp in the copy of KOSSOH TOWN BOY I was awarded during my school years

Image of Robert Wellesley Cole